Tag Archives: American elm

Instatree

I mentioned in an earlier post that the American elm can be a fast grower under the right conditions.

In 2005, Tree Watch and Trees Atlanta planted a line of American elms along Atlantis Avenue, on a low embankment between the parking lot behind Fritti and the street.

Here they are in 2010:

And a year and a half later in Fall 2011:

Three years later in 2014:

In September 2018 (in a photograph taken from the southbound lane of Elizabeth Street):

And here they are today:

Bark Inclusion

If you happen to be a tree, one of the bigger challenges you have is this: I need energy to grow and reproduce! So I’m gonna reach for sunlight, water, and nutrients. But how far and fast can I reach before something like this happens?

The photograph above shows an American elm (Ulmus americana ‘Princeton’) planted years ago by Tree Watch and Trees Atlanta in Freedom Park.

American elm is really great at reaching. It can grow fast. When it’s at home — ‘home’ being rich, alluvial soil in a forested floodplain along a river or stream — a tall American elm will have channeled so much of its energy into growing upward, in order to reach that lovely sunlight at the top of the forest, that it may have no branches at all until the 50- or 60-foot mark.

Photo credit: Christian O. Marks

Of course, an American elm growing in an open, grassy section of Freedom Park has no difficulty at all accessing sunlight. It’s like a kid left alone in a candy shop. (Think of that poor elm tree in Freedom Park as a kid with a terrible tummy ache.)

Continue reading Bark Inclusion