Looking for a Tree Service?

This is Chris Hastings of Arbormedics, one of several firms with which Tree Watch has collaborated in the past.

We get asked all the time by Inman Park residents to recommend a tree service. We always say: whoever you choose, be sure to ask whether that company’s arborists are certified by the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA).

Also, please note that every reputable company has workers trained in how to climb trees using ropes and safety harnesses. Even when a very large tree must be removed, it may be possible for the workers to start at the top and remove the tree in sections, lowering them to the ground with their ropes. In sum, although the use of a crane or cherrypicker is sometimes unavoidable, often it isn’t.  And as you would guess, the price difference may be substantial.

Here are some some resources to help you find an arborist at a tree service. Continue reading Looking for a Tree Service?

Ken’s War on Snarl

Tree Watch member Ken Taber likes to call the overgrown, neglected corners of Inman Park — with their tangles of wisteria, privet, leatherleaf mahonia, thorny olive, tree of heaven, and other invasive plants — “snarls.” They look something like this:

And for physical activity, Ken likes nothing better than charging his battery-powered chainsaw and strapping on the holster of his handsaw for an afternoon of reducing Inman Park’s snarl problem.

Can You ID These Trees?

Bob and Wendy Palmer Patterson’s yard at the corner of Euclid Avenue and Hurt Street in Inman Park is a plant lover’s paradise. See if you can identify the species of each of the three larger trees shown in this photo.

Send us your answer: common name and scientific name for each tree, please. (Hey, that’s what Google is for!) The first correct response gets a free Inman Park Tree Watch T-shirt!