Category Archives: Pruning

Who actually owns our street trees?

The answer should be clear.

It’s not, at least not to me.

  • “The City of Atlanta owns them, Jim. That’s obvious. After all, they’re in the public right-of-way. You’re forbidden by law from removing or injuring those trees, but the City itself can do whatever it wants with them. Clearly, the trees belong to the City.”
  • “You own them, Jim. After all, you’re the one who’s legally responsible for maintaining that strip along the street (e.g., keeping it level with the sidewalk, keeping it free of holes and weeds, pruning the trees themselves). If the City has to step in and do the maintenance for you, it can charge you with the expense. If the City abandons its right-of-way along the road, you’re the one with the reversionary right. And so on. Clearly, the trees belong to you.”

Totally confusing.

Continue reading Who actually owns our street trees?

Absolute Torture

I wish I could tell you that walking around our leafy, shady, drop-dead-gorgeous neighborhood is a continual source of unmitigated joy for us tree guys and tree gals.

It ain’t. Not always, anyway. Sometimes it feels like torture.

Here’s the problem. (Cue the violins.) Everywhere a tree guy looks, he sees work that needs doing. And work that should have been done but wasn’t. And work that he did but now needs doing again.

Sigh.

Here’s an example.

That’s a live oak (Quercus virginiana ‘Cathedral’) which Tree Watch planted several years ago, and which one of our neighbors (it seems) has now had “pruned” by his yard crew (I’m guessing), which should definitely be calling itself Jack the Ripper Lawn Care Services.

It’s like a person going for a pedicure and coming home with two bleeding stumps instead of legs.

It’s like that oak tree dissed his mama. Twice.

You know what happens when a person abuses a tree like that? One day, it falls on somebody’s head.

Here’s another example.

You’re wondering where the tree is. Me, too. It was there two days ago, and I well remember the morning that Melissa and her family planted it.

A tree guy thinks, “I should have pruned that live oak again, before the homeowner got frustrated with it.” He thinks, however illogically, “I should have known that there were new owners of that house, and thought to talk to them about the white oak tree we planted in that yard.”

Sigh.

Trees can be like our children. The dad or mom looks at their son and thinks, “I sure love him, but gosh does he need a haircut and a new pair of blue jeans.”

Thanks to our volunteers

On Wednesday, October 21, Steve and Marge Hays, Dave Darling, Chuck Young, and Jim Abbot pruned trees in Poplar Circle and along stretches of Hurt, Elizabeth, and Euclid. Below are (L-R) Steve, Dave, and Chuck. Our next pruning workday will be on Wednesday, November 18, at 9:00 AM. Meet at 946 Waverly Way (intersection of Waverly and Hurt).

On Saturday, October 24, Lynn Curtis Koehnemann, Dave Darling, Chuck Young, David Bikoff, and Jim Abbot cleaned and adjusted the granite markers in the Inman Park Arboretum. Below are David and Chuck resetting the marker for a pignut hickory (Carya glabra) along the Freedom Park trail.

Thank you to all of our volunteers!

Pruning Tip #1: Mastering Reduction Cuts

This young blackgum or tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica), a tree species native to Georgia, was beginning to sprawl into Euclid Avenue and the adjacent sidewalk. With the Inman Park Festival & Tour of Homes coming up, Tree Watch wanted to do some light pruning, fearing that someone would inadvertently damage the tree by ripping away a branch.

Rather than remove an entire branch or branches — this prize needs to photosynthesize! — we opted for a series of reduction cuts

Continue reading Pruning Tip #1: Mastering Reduction Cuts

Ken’s War on Snarl

Tree Watch member Ken Taber likes to call the overgrown, neglected corners of Inman Park — with their tangles of wisteria, privet, leatherleaf mahonia, thorny olive, tree of heaven, and other invasive plants — “snarls.” They look something like this:

And for physical activity, Ken likes nothing better than charging his battery-powered chainsaw and strapping on the holster of his handsaw for an afternoon of reducing Inman Park’s snarl problem.