Category Archives: Care

Wanna Help? Here’s How!

If you love Inman Park’s trees — heck, even if you’re just the slightest bit fond of them — there are ways to support them. Here are some:

Help Us Prune Our Trees

We have ongoing pruning projects. Our next scheduled workday is Monday, October 16th, 9:00 AM. Meet on the porch of 946 Waverly Way. Don’t worry! Even if you don’t have much experience, we can use your help.

Help Us Find Places to Plant

We’re always on the lookout for empty spots in yards and sidewalk planting strips. On Saturday, November 4th, 9:00 AM, we’ll gather on the porch of 946 Waverly Way for a brief training in how to recognize a good spot for a tree. Afterward, we’ll head out in teams of two to walk a few of our neighborhood streets and take some notes. Join us!

Help Us Plant New Trees

We’ll be planting trees in Inman Park on the morning of Saturday, January 13th, rain or shine. Meet us on the porch of 207 Hurt Street at 8:30 AM for coffee and bagels, and then we’ll get to work.

Help Us Advocate for Our Urban Forest

Follow this blog and/or our Twitter account (@inmanparktrees) for news about tree and urban forest protection in Atlanta. The next 18 months will be full of opportunities to protect Atlanta’s future urban forest. Your voice at a public meeting or in an emailed comment really can make a difference!

Support Tree Watch Financially

Tax-deductible donations to support our work may be sent to:

  • Mr. Steve Hays, Treasurer
  • Friends of Inman Park
  • 207 Hurt St. NE
  • Atlanta, GA 30307

Trees and Sidewalks

What the heck?

Yep, arborist Chris Hughes of Brookwood Tree Consulting was in the ‘hood yesterday. He was here at the invitation of Inman Park Tree Watch, in order to assess several trees in the path of our upcoming sidewalk renovation projects.

Here’s Chris with Peter Coyne of Oakview Landscape Construction, at the base of a lovely, mature American elm on Euclid Avenue. The goal? Get this sidewalk work done with minimal to no impact on nearby trees.

With guidance from Hughes and drawing on deep experience working around our trees in Inman Park, Coyne is able to pull all sorts of tricks from his sleeve: bridging over roots, skirting around them, and so on.

We’re so lucky to have professionals like Hughes and Coyne working in Inman Park! And we’re proud to have a thoughtful program in place to ensure that we do everything possible to protect the health and prolong the lives of our street trees.

In Which We Embark on Remarks about Parks

Community planner and parks guru Dee Merriam, late of the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health, was in the ‘hood on September 14 to give a presentation for us at the Trolley Barn.  “Making People Places” was her title.

Knowledge was had by all.

And now we gotta think about stuff like this, which Dee pointed out on her tour of Inman Park: (1) visibility issues, (2) problems with access points, and (3) too few reasons to go to our parks.

So, would it be nice eventually to have a path with seating areas along the western edges of Springvale Park? With proper clearance of understory plants and some limbing up of trees, think how pleasant it could be to sit with a friend and look down into our little gem of a park.

We have so much maintenance to do! Who would know that behind this dense wall of green is a beautiful and historic park?

What safety-conscious person would venture into this Continue reading In Which We Embark on Remarks about Parks

Pruning Tip #1: Mastering Reduction Cuts

This young blackgum or tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica), a tree species native to Georgia, was beginning to sprawl into Euclid Avenue and the adjacent sidewalk. With the Inman Park Festival & Tour of Homes coming up, Tree Watch wanted to do some light pruning, fearing that someone would inadvertently damage the tree by ripping away a branch.

Rather than remove an entire branch or branches — this prize needs to photosynthesize! — we opted for a series of reduction cuts

Continue reading Pruning Tip #1: Mastering Reduction Cuts